Blog / Duke Magazine: Reflections of a Collector

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By Wendy

We always love senior writer Bridget Booher’s take on our exhibitions in Duke magazine.
In this month’s issue, she tracks down Jason Rubell  in Miami.
“As the son of contemporary art collectors, Jason Rubell spent a fair amount of his childhood at gallery openings and museum exhibitions,” she writes. “By the time he was a teenager, Rubell started buying artwork that caught his eye, using money he’d made stringing tennis rackets. But he never thought of himself as a collector until his senior year at Duke.”

During his senior year, in 1991, Rubell put together an exhibition of his collection with the help of his professor Kristine Stiles, at the former Duke University Museum of Art on East Campus. He will reprise that exhibition here at the Nasher Museum, later this summer. “Time Capsule, Age 13 to 21: The Contemporary Art Collection of Jason Rubell” opens August 23. The exhibition will be nearly identical to his senior project. The show includes seminal early works by Ross Bleckner, George Condo, Robert Gober, Andreas Gursky, Keith Haring, Jenny Holzer, Jeff Koons, Sol Lewitt, Bruce Nauman, Richard Prince, Gerhard Richter, Cindy Sherman, Thomas Struth, Rosemarie Trockel, Christopher Wool, and many others.

Jason is now one of the world’s most important collectors of contemporary art. He is a member of the Nasher Museum’s national board of advisors.

To our delight, Jason plans to give a talk on September 5 with Kristine Stiles, now Duke’s France Family Professor of Art, Art History & Visual Studies.

Read the whole story here.

IMAGE: Rubell in front of Keith Haring’s nine-panel series exploring the burgeoning AIDS epidemic. Photo courtesy of Jason Rubell.

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