Blog / Interacting with Area 919

Posted By Jenna Poczik

Lincoln Hancock with Yuxtapongo, Exploded Hipster (detail), 2012. Clothing donated by the Triangle music community, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Neill Prewitt.
Exhibition Opening Event: Saturday, January 24, 6-8 PM.

As the opening night approaches, I cannot wait to see the Area 919: Artists in the Triangle in its entirety. Every time I walk into the Nasher, I catch glimpses of the exhibition coming to life while the artists set up their work. Ranging from an array of clothing splattered across a wall (Lincoln Hancock with Yuxtapongo, Exploded Hipster) to Harrison Haynes’s six individually framed prints (Oran Mor / Pointe Ephemere / Feierwerk / Button Factory / Trix Centrum / Subterranean), Area 919 has a lot to offer.
nasher-919-haynes-blog

ABOVE: Harrison Haynes, Oran Mor / Pointe Ephemere / Feierwerk / Button Factory / Trix Centrum / Subterranean, 2012. Suite of six archival inkjet prints. Courtesy of the artist. © Harrison Haynes.

As a Duke student and art lover, it is always exciting to have the artwork of renowned artists like Miró or Rauschenberg available to see right here on campus. However, it is equally exciting for me to see a unique exhibition like this one. The Triangle is full of diverse, talented artists, and I am glad to see this showcased at the Nasher.

Physically connecting the audience and the art is Stacey L. Kirby’s interactive piece, Power of the Ballot. Interactive art has always intrigued me since it is not the norm to be involved with an exhibition. Kirby has created a series of what she calls “performative interactions” to start conversation about identity, community and belonging. This particular piece invites the viewer to cast his or her vote in an “election” about voting obstacles, receiving a ballot from and handing it back to the hand of an anonymous person inside the ballot box.
Stacey L. Kirby, Power of the Ballot, 2014. Mixed media, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Alex Maness.

ABOVE: Stacey L. Kirby, Power of the Ballot, 2014. Mixed media, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Alex Maness.

Thought-provoking pieces like this one make Area 919 the perfect way to connect Duke and Durham through art.

Area 919 also features work by Jeff Bell, Casey Cook, André Leon Gray, George Jenne, Lavar Munroe, Damian Stamer, Bill Thelen, Hong-An Truong, Stacy Lynn Waddell, and Jeff Whetstone. The exhibition is open to the public starting January 24.  

Jenna Poczik, Duke University class of 2017

TOP: Lincoln Hancock with Yuxtapongo, Exploded Hipster (detail), 2012. Clothing donated by the Triangle music community, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Neill Prewitt.

 

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