Blog / Colour Correction by Marshall Price

Posted by J Caldwell and Marshall Price

Curator Marshall N. Price recently spoke about Colour Correction: British and American Screenprints, 1967-1975, an exhibition of screenprints from the era of war protests, the hippy movement and psychedelic culture. Drawn mostly from the museum’s collection, Colour Correction focuses on a period of experimentation and productivity that many art historians call the “golden age” of screenprinting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Andy Warhol, Open This End, 1962. Screenprint on linen, 8 x 11 inches (20.32 x 27.94 cm). Collection of Blake Byrne, T’57. Image courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, California. © 2014 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, New York. Photo by Brian Forrest.

 

Tour of Colour Correction

 

 

Kill For Peace

 

 

 

Big Daddy Paper Doll

 

Joint Chiefs

 

 

I was a Rich Man's Plaything 1947 by Sir Eduardo Paolozzi 1924-2005

 

General Dynamic F.U.N.

 

 

Kitaj

 

 

Homage to the Square

 

 

Watch the opening on YouTube (25 minutes).

 

 

The Inward Eye

 

Spectral Cadmium

 

Watch an interview with Anuszkiewicz on YouTube.

 

Print for Chicago 8

Andy Warhol, Open This End, 1962. Screenprint on linen, 8 x 11 inches (20.32 x 27.94 cm). Collection of Blake Byrne, T’57. Image courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, California. © 2014 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, New York. Photo by Brian Forrest.

Tour photo by J Caldwell.

Carol Summers, Kill for Peace from the portfolio Artists and Writers Protest Against the War in Viet Nam, 1967. Screenprint on paper, edition 81/100, 23 1/2 x 19 1/4 inches (59.7 x 48.9 cm). Collection of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Dorsky, 1972.9.1. © Carol Summers. Photo by Peter Paul Geoffrion.

May Stevens, Big Daddy Paper Doll, 1971. Screenprint on paper, 21 x 35 inches (53.3 x 88.9 cm). Collection of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Dorsky, 1973.29.1. © May Stevens. Courtesy of the artist and Ryan Lee, New York, NY. Photo by Peter Paul Geoffrion.

Joint Chiefs of Staff. Fair Use. Retrievied May 1, 2015 [Source].

Eduardo Paolozzi, I was a Rich Man’s Plaything, 1947. Fair Use. Retrieved May 1, 2015 [Source].

Eduardo Luigi Paolozzi, British, 1924-2005: Sex CrimeWave Rolling High, from General Dynamic F.U.N., n.d., Screenprint, 14 15/16 x 10 in. (38 x 25.4 cm) Lent courtesy of the Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Eduardo Luigi Paolozzi, British, 1924-2005:Brainiac 5 o puede contra tres maquinas, from General Dynamic F.U.N., n.d., Screenprint, 14 15/16 x 10 in. (38 x 25.4 cm) Lent courtesy of the Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Eduardo Luigi Paolozzi, British, 1924-2005: No Heroes Developed, from General Dynamic F.U.N., n.d., Screenprint, 14 15/16 x 10 in. (38 x 25.4 cm) Lent courtesy of the Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Eduardo Luigi Paolozzi, British, 1924-2005: Fortunes Guide to Government Contracts, from General Dynamic F.U.N., n.d., Screenprint, 14 15/16 x 10 in. (38 x 25.4 cm) Lent courtesy of the Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Eduardo Luigi Paolozzi, British, 1924-2005: The accident syndrome, the Genesis of injury, from General Dynamic F.U.N., n.d., Screenprint, 14 15/16 x 10 in. (38 x 25.4 cm) Lent courtesy of the Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Eduardo Luigi Paolozzi, British, 1924-2005:Watch out for Miracles, from General Dynamic F.U.N., n.d., Screenprint, 14 15/16 x 10 in. (38 x 25.4 cm) Lent courtesy of the Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

R.B. Kitaj , Multiple prints from the portfolio In Our Time: Covers for a Small Library After the Life for the Most Part, 1969. Screenprint and photoscreenprints on paper, edition 61/150, dimensions variable. Collection of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Gift of Robert Anthoine, 1999.7.1. © The Estate of R.B. Kitaj, Marlborough Gallery, New York. Photos by Peter Paul Geoffrion.

Josef Albers, Variants from the portfolio Formulation : Articulation, 1972. Screenprint on Mohawk Superfine Bristol paper, edition 362/1000, 12 1/2 x 13 inches (31.8 x 33 cm) each. Collection of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Gift of The Josef Albers Foundation, 1975.8.1.28. © The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Peter Paul Geoffrion.

Richard Anuszkiewicz, Untitled from the portfolio Inward Eye, 1970. Screenprint on paper, 25 9/16 x 19 9/16 inches (64.9 x 49.7 cm). Collection of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Gift of Ramona Morgan. © Richard Anuszkiewicz / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photo by Peter Paul Geoffrion.

Richard Anuszkiewicz, Spectral Cadmium from the portfolio Spectral Cadmiums, 1968. Screenprint on paper, 26 3/4 x 26 3/4 inches (67.9 x 67.9 cm). Collection of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Gift of Nancy Hanks. © Richard Anuszkiewicz / Licensed by VAGA, New York. Photo by Peter Paul Geoffrion.

Bridget Riley, British, born 1931: Print for Chicago 8, from Conspiracy: the Artist As Witness Portfolio, 1971, Screenprint, 24 x 18 1/16 in. (61 x 45.9 cm) Lent courtesy of the Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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