Skip to main content

Lines of Control: Partition as a Productive Space

September 19, 2013 – February 02, 2014
Anita Dube, River/Disease (detail), 1999 (reconfigured 2009). Ceramic eyes mounted on wall, overall height 120 inches (305 cm). Photo by J Caldwell.
Young visitors lean in for a closer look at a video of an ant caught within a drawn line. The 2013 video was created by Bengaluru artist Surekha, entitled Line of Control. Photo by J Caldwell.
Young visitors lean in for a closer look at a video of an ant caught within a drawn line. The 2013 video was created by Bengaluru artist Surekha, entitled Line of Control. Photo by J Caldwell.

The exhibition Lines of Control: Partition as a Productive Space explored the creation and maintenance of borders, both physical as well as psychological, through the works of artists primarily from South Asia but also Mexico, Lebanon and Ireland. This exhibition was co-curated by Hammad Nasar, curator and co-founder of Green Cardamom, and Iftikhar Dadi, associate professor of art history and art department chair at Cornell University. The show was brought to the attention of the Nasher Museum by history professor Sumathi Ramaswamy, as an ideal collaboration for her students in Duke’s BorderWorks Humanities Lab.

Lines of Control was made possible by the William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust, the Fenwick Foundation, and Barbara Nicholson McFadyen. Additional support was provided by the BorderWork(s) Humanities Lab at the Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University, supported by the Humanities Writ Large grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter

The health and safety of our community is our top priority. In accordance with Duke University, the museum is closed to visitors until further notice. The café and store are closed. Find updates and the latest information on Duke’s Coronavirus Response website.