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The Nasher Museum presents Kindship & Belonging, an interactive feature on a 20-foot wall in the museum’s Great Hall, created in conjunction with the major fall exhibition, Art for a New Understanding: Native Voices, 1950s to Now.

Visitors are invited to ponder these questions and use them as a starting point to learn more about the Indigenous peoples who live and work in North Carolina.

Special thanks to our Native colleagues around North Carolina for their guidance on Kinship & Belonging: Dawn Arneach (Eastern Band of Cherokee), Danny Bell (Lumbee), Nancy Strickland Fields (Lumbee), Jane Haladay, Mary Ann Jacobs (Lumbee), Malinda Maynor Lowery (Lumbee), Robin Swayney (Eastern Band of Cherokee) and Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote (Kiowa).

The Nasher Museum presents Kindship & Belonging, an interactive feature on a 20-foot wall in the museum’s Great Hall, created in conjunction with the major fall exhibition, Art for a New Understanding: Native Voices, 1950s to Now.

Kinship & Belonging

Questions (click to expand for answers)

ANSWER: North Carolina is home to the largest Indigenous population in the eastern United States.

ANSWER: 122,110, according to the most recent U.S. Census data

ANSWER: Seven – Coharie, Haliwa-Saponi, Lumbee, Meherrin, Occaneechi Band of the Saponi, Sappony and Waccamaw Siouan. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is the only federally recognized tribe in North Carolina.

ANSWER: The North Carolina curriculum teaches the history of Native American peoples in the 4th grade. However, in tribal communities the education continues daily.

ANSWER: Turtle Island is a Native American and First Nations name for the Earth or North America.

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