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Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University

He wasn’t the Lichtenstein that we know of in the art market and in the annals of art history. He was a young artist trying to make rent, trying to make sense of this sort impulse to make work. And trying to find his way.

Durham artist Stacy Lynn Waddell, during her recent gallery talk about Roy Lichtenstein and his early work from 1948 to 1960
More Exhibitions
Nasher Member Holiday Party:
December 6 at 6 PM
MEMBER EVENTS

Nasher Member Holiday Party:
December 6 at 6 PM

Nasher members help us accomplish so much—now let us treat you! Mingle with your fellow members and museum staff during an exclusive after-hours museum experience. Enjoy browsing the galleries, music, double-discount shopping, complimentary gift wrapping and more! Cash bar and hors d’oeuvres. RSVP by December 1.

Magnolia #5 by Barkley L. Hendricks
NEW TO THE COLLECTION

Magnolia #5 by Barkley L. Hendricks

This work on paper is a significant addition to the Nasher Museum’s collection.

Helen Frankenthaler: Un Poco Más (A Little More)
VIRTUAL EXHIBITION

Helen Frankenthaler: Un Poco Más (A Little More)

We invite you to peruse the gallery, zoom in to works of art and also take in a 360-degree view of the Great Hall. Our new virtual exhibition was created in partnership with Duke’s Digital Art History & Visual Culture Research Lab

NASHER IN THE NEWS

Take the Kids: Nasher Museum of Art

Tandra Wilkerson, also known as Thriller Mom, takes her daughters on a fun visit to the Nasher Museum.

NASHER IN THE NEWS

Quilting as a Powerful Tool for African American Women Artists

Artnews features “Housetop,” a 1970 quilt by Nettie Pettway Young that is on view now in the group exhibition Beyond the Surface.

Pushing boundaries: Artists who challenge the way we look at American history
GOOGLE ARTS AND CULTURE

Pushing boundaries: Artists who challenge the way we look at American history

Artist Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds (Arapaho and Cheyenne) is featured in a new story on the Nasher Museum’s Google Arts & Culture page. The museum has been collecting works by Heap of Birds and other Indigenous artists over the past six years: Jeffrey Gibson (Choctaw and Cherokee), G. Peter Jemison (Seneca, Heron Clan), Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Salish and Kootenai), Wendy Red Star Apsáalooke/Crow) and Fritz Scholder (Luiseño). The Nasher Museum’s story is included in Google Arts & Culture’s newly launched hub, Indigenous Americas, which celebrates and honors the incredible contributions Indigenous peoples have made across the Americas.

Welcome!
FREE ADMISSION FOR ALL

Welcome!

All three pavilions are open with exhibitions featuring early work by Roy Lichtenstein, contemporary art from our collection and also historical works of art representing a brief history of human creativity from different times and parts of the world. Free admission for all. Courtesy of Jennifer McCracken New and Jason New.

The Nasher Museum is fully open to the public with free admission for all, including Thursday nights and weekends. We strongly encourage all individuals to be fully vaccinated before visiting the Nasher.