Light Sensitive
Photographic Works from North Carolina Collections
February 14 - May 12, 2013

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FEATURED ARTIST
Larry Fink
In his extraordinary series of photographs of praying mantises, Fink used a square format camera, whose larger negative renders greater detail than a 35mm, to look at a different order of being. Read more about Fink's "portrait" of a praying mantis.
 

Light Sensitive includes over 100 works, from tiny early daguerreotypes to large-scale contemporary color prints and videos, and is drawn from twelve public and private North Carolina collections. The exhibition is structured to challenge the widespread notion of the photographic medium as a form of mere realism. Understanding of photographic media suffers from the long-standing myth that a camera is an ‘innocent eye’ that transparently records an image of the world as if through an open window. Some of the power of photography comes precisely from faith in this myth, a myth that has been extremely useful in photographic journalism, in courtrooms, on television and on the internet, despite a long history of visual alteration ranging from subtle artistic manipulation to deliberate propagandistic deceit. Though the camera is capable of recording images of the world in astonishing detail, a great variety of photographic tools and techniques can work to take ordinary features of a photograph—light and dark, shape and form, depth and space, size and scale, soft and sharp focus—and transform them into elements that alter our vision.

To emphasize how these aspects of the photographic medium operate, works from across the history of this medium and photography-based media are organized into the following sections, each highlighting the ability of artists to wield the camera as a social and aesthetic tool. Light Magic reveals alterations of light, and its consequences; Intensified Vision ranges through other transformative techniques, such as angle of vision, focus, color and distortions of scale; Metamorphosis presents even bolder manipulations such as long exposures, printing from several negatives and frankly fictional works; Emulations showcases artists’ open engagement with other media, including painting, printmaking, literature and film; and Constructed Identities,focused on portraiture, shows how photographers construct identity for their subjects, or how they convey the subtle ways their subjects are shaped by their society and circumstances. These sections raise questions about how artists use photography as an aesthetic medium, employing their sophisticated arsenal of techniques to persuade us of their unique perceptions.

Light Sensitive is co-organized by guest curator Patricia Leighten, Professor of Art History & Visual Studies at Duke, and Sarah Schroth, Nasher Museum’s Interim Director and Nancy Hanks Senior Curator.



FEATURED ARTIST
Larry Fink
Larry Fink's photograph This Sporting Life, September 1978 is a seemingly straightforward image of the real world, yet through nuanced ways the viewers’ attention is drawn to what Fink seeing. These subtle techniques result not so much in exaggeration as intensification of vision. Read more about Fink's "portrait" of a praying mantis.
 
           
Location
Hours
Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat - 10 AM to 5 PM
Thu - 10 AM to 9 PM
Sun - Noon to 5 PM
Mon - closed
Admission
General admission to the Nasher Museum is $5 ($4 for Seniors). Admission is FREE for Nasher Museum members, children 15 and under, Duke students, faculty and staff with Duke I.D. and Duke Alumni Association Members with Alumni Membership Card. Thursday, 5-9 PM admission is free for all.

Admission is also FREE to all active duty military personnel and up to five family members, with military ID: Geneva Convention common access card (CAC), a DD Form 1173 ID card, or a DD Form 1173-1 ID card.
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Light Sensitive: Photographic Works from North Carolina Collections
February 14 - May 12, 2013
Light Sensitive is co-organized by guest curator Patricia Leighten, Professor of Art History & Visual Studies at Duke, and Sarah Schroth, Interim Director and Nancy Hanks Senior Curator at the Nasher Museum.
Light Sensitive is made possible by the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, and the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University.

Nasher Museum exhibitions and programs are generously supported by the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, the late Mary D.B.T. Semans and James H. Semans, the late Frank E. Hanscom III, The Duke Endowment, the Nancy Hanks Endowment, the Courtney Shives Art Museum Fund, the James Hustead Semans Memorial Fund, the Janine and J. Tomilson Hill Family Fund, the Trent A. Carmichael Fund for Community Education, the Neely Family Fund, the E. T. Rollins, Jr. and Frances P. Rollins Fund for the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, the Marilyn M. Arthur Fund, the Sarah Schroth Fund, the George W. and Viola Mitchell Fearnside Endowment Fund, the Gibby and Michael B. Waitzkin Fund, the K. Brantley and Maxine E. Watson Endowment Fund, the Victor and Lenore Behar Endowment Fund, the Margaret Elizabeth Collett Fund, the Nasher Museum of Art General Endowment, the Friends of the Nasher Museum of Art, and the Office of the President and the Office of the Provost, Duke University.

Box 90732 | Durham, NC 27708 | 919-684-5135 | nasher.duke.edu

Box 90732 | Durham, NC 27708
919-684-5135 | nasher.duke.edu

           
Location
Hours
Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat - 10 AM to 5 PM
Thu - 10 AM to 9 PM
Sun - Noon to 5 PM
Mon - closed
Admission
General admission to the Nasher Museum is $5 ($4 for Seniors). Admission is FREE for Nasher Museum members, children 15 and under, Duke students, faculty and staff with Duke I.D. and Duke Alumni Association Members with Alumni Membership Card. Thursday, 5-9 PM admission is free for all.

Admission is also FREE to all active duty military personnel and up to five family members, with military ID: Geneva Convention common access card (CAC), a DD Form 1173 ID card, or a DD Form 1173-1 ID card.
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