Blog / #nasherbookchat

Posted By Wendy Hower

Peter Tukei at the Front Desk

Have you met Peter Tukei at our information desk?

He will tell you anything you need to know!

Peter is a native of Uganda, and is avid follower of  author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, who wrote Americanah, a beautiful story about identity, race and culture. 

This week, Peter will join Associate Curator of Education Jessica Ruhle and Academic Program Coordinator Molly Boarati in leading two public book discussions at the Nasher Museum. All visitors are invited to the book discussions on Wednesday, July 16, at 11 AM (University Classroom), and Sunday, July 20, at 2 PM (University Classroom).

“This novel was written by a female and I’m very excited to read it,” Peter told us recently. He says that the story is an excellent take on knowing that our differences have value here in America and that we should celebrate those differences. As an African living in America, he says, you view your homeland through a different prospective.

We asked him if he thinks it’s hard for an immigrant to find success here in the United States.

“It depends on the aspect of the individual of whether or not it is easy to live in America,” he said. “I would recommend this book to both Americans and non-Americans because it is a story that acknowledges the differences in people and it points out that it’s okay to be different.”

Duke’s incoming first-year class is also reading the book. Americanah is the third novel by the award-winning, Nigerian-born author. The story follows Ifemelu and Obinze, two students who left Nigeria to pursue an education in the United States. An emotionally charged coming-of-age story, Americanah goes beyond a college romance, and deals with the very real struggles of race, identity and finding out what “home” means.

Find the installation related to this book in the Nasher Museum’s Academic Focus Gallery, just outside the university classroom.

ABOVE: Peter Tukei (right) greets a visitor at the Nasher Museum. Photo by J Caldwell.

Student interns Steven Neal and Taylor Blakeney contributed to this article.

 

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