Blog / Nasher Memories: Jonathan Prinz, supporting member

Posted by Jonathan Prinz

Prinz

Do you remember when the Nasher Museum opened on October 2, 2005? Maybe you were here with 5,000 visitors, when Durham Mayor Bill Bell declared that this museum belongs to Durham. Or maybe you got to know the Nasher Museum over the next decade. We’ve asked folks to share their favorite Nasher memories, in honor of Nasher10, the celebration of a decade and beyond.

“I moved here in 2006 having lived most of my life just a 30-minute walk from New York’s greatest museums. They were integral to my being. It wasn’t long before I discovered and joined the Nasher Museum. I was immediately struck by both the quality of the art and how beautifully each exhibition was curated. Equally important, were those who made it all happen, beginning with my first conversation with Sarah Schroth about El Greco. Implied in these first encounters was a promise more than fulfilled by the likes of The Vorticists, Alexander Calder, Collecting Matisse, The Record, Wangechi Mutu, Archibald Motley and just recently Miró. For me, the Nasher’s soul lies in its people─gifted professionals and great friends. What differentiates it is delivering such excellence at a human scale. Excellence is a trademark of my beloved New York museums, but the Nasher’s contrasting humanity and accessibility is what puts it at the center of my North Carolina life.”

Jonathan Prinz, Chapel Hill resident, supporting member of the Nasher Museum

IMAGE: Jonathan Prinz (pointing) and other visitors take in the details of The Harrowing of Hell, an early 17th-century oil painting from Germany or The Netherlands. Photo by J Caldwell.

 


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