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Black Mirror/Espejo Negro

May 22, 2008 – January 18, 2009
Pedro Lasch, Black Mirror #4: Hypnotism & Necromancy (detail), 2008. Installation using Jalisco, Mexico, Ameca Gray type, Seated female figure, 200 BCE- 300 CE, ceramic with red and gray-white slip paint. Collection of the Nasher Museum, from the Paul A. and Virginia Clifford Collection. Reproduction behind glass: El Greco, Portrait of an Ecclesiastic, about 1610-14. Oil on canvas, 42 1/8 x 35 1/2 inches. Collection of the Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas.

Commissioned Installation

Pedro Lasch, Black Mirror #4: Hypnotism & Necromancy, 2008. Installation using Jalisco, Mexico, Ameca Gray type, Seated female figure, 200 BCE- 300 CE, ceramic with red and gray-white slip paint. Collection of the Nasher Museum, from the Paul A. and Virginia Clifford Collection. Reproduction behind glass: El Greco, Portrait of an Ecclesiastic, about 1610-14. Oil on canvas, 42 1/8 x 35 1/2 inches. Collection of the Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas.
Pedro Lasch, Black Mirror #4: Hypnotism & Necromancy, 2008. Installation using Jalisco, Mexico, Ameca Gray type, Seated female figure, 200 BCE- 300 CE, ceramic with red and gray-white slip paint. Collection of the Nasher Museum, from the Paul A. and Virginia Clifford Collection. Reproduction behind glass: El Greco, Portrait of an Ecclesiastic, about 1610-14. Oil on canvas, 42 1/8 x 35 1/2 inches. Collection of the Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas.

This large-scale installation by artist Pedro Lasch incorporated his sculpture with more than a dozen works from the Nasher Museum’s collection. The museum commissioned the work to accompany El Greco to Velázquez: Art during the Reign of Philip III (2008) and also Escultura Social: A New Generation of Art from Mexico City (2009).

Artist, Curator & Professor

Duke students take a closer look at Black Mirror/Espejo Negro, an installation with dark glass sheets and works from the Nasher Museum's collection. Photo by Jerry Blow.
Duke students take a closer look at Black Mirror/Espejo Negro, an installation with dark glass sheets and works from the Nasher Museum's collection. Photo by Jerry Blow.

With Black Mirror/Espejo Negro, Lasch brought his own poetic and aesthetic reflections to the museum’s pre-Columbian collection, one of the most important of its kind. Lasch teaches art and art theory in Duke’s Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies. He was born and raised in Mexico City and has been based in New York and North Carolina since 1994.

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