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States of Mind: Dan & Lia Perjovschi

FACULTY-CURATED EXHIBITION

August 23, 2007 – January 06, 2008
Dan Perjovschi creates humorous drawings on the museum’s exterior windows using current events and situations special to Duke as his inspiration. Photo by Duke Photography.
Artists and partners Dan and Lia Perjovschi pose at the entrance to the exhibition with curator Kristine Stiles. Photo by Duke Photography.
Artists and partners Dan and Lia Perjovschi pose at the entrance to the exhibition with curator Kristine Stiles. Photo by Duke Photography.

The Nasher Museum presented a mid-career retrospective of the work of Romanian artists Dan Perjovschi and Lia Perjovschi. Born in 1961 and educated in the Romanian socialism system, Dan and Lia Perjovschi create work that resides at the nexus of art, society and politics; both artists belong to the first avant-garde movement following the 1989 Romania Revolution. Dan is internationally renowned for large and small scale drawing installations of hundreds of cartoon-like figures that comment on local, national and international cultural and current affairs. He is also the foremost political cartoon satirist in Romania. Lia is well known for her performance and conceptual art. This unprecedented exhibition included paintings, sculptures, drawings, photographs, videos, installations and conceptual art from 1986 to 2007, as well as new commissioned works. The show followed a recent installation of Dan Perjovschi’s drawings in the “Projects” section of the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

The exhibition was curated by Kristine Stiles, France Family Professor of Art, Art History, & Visual Studies at Duke.

Featured Featured Video

States of Mind: Dan and Lia Perjovschi, curated by Kristine Stiles

by Nasher Museum Duration 05m 16s Published

The Nasher has given me such a continual stream of pleasures that it is quite a challenge to single out the best of the best. But here’s one thought: coming to the Nasher just after the graphic artist Dan Perjovschi had had his wildly impressive show at the MOMA to see his new show at the Nasher, and finding that he himself was just hanging out in the atrium—willing to engage with anybody, and just as easy, funny, and provocative as his
work—and then doing new drawings with magic markers on the Nasher windows! It was art as product and art
as process and art as living human creativity and exchange, all rolled into one. Just one example of the way the Nasher makes us feel more fully alive.

Richard H. Brodhead, Former President of Duke University
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