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We are thrilled to present this exhibition of work made by many of the outstanding artists who live and work in North Carolina. The exhibition reflects the collective work and energy of the artists and our curatorial team over many months, and I’m especially grateful for their ability to think creatively during challenging times. At our core, we seek to champion the work of thought-provoking artists, and that is exactly what this show does.

Trevor Schoonmaker, Mary D.B.T. and James H. Semans Director of the Nasher Museum
Clarence Heyward, PTSD, 2020. Acrylic and gold leaf on canvas, 60 x 48 inches (152.4 x 121.92 cm). © Clarence Heyward. Image courtesy of the artist. This work is part of the exhibition Reckoning and Resilience: North Carolina Art Now.

The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University presents Reckoning and Resilience: North Carolina Art Now, which brings together 30 emerging and established artists working across the state. This group survey, featuring approximately 100 works, presents an expansive view of contemporary art in North Carolina both in terms of regional geography and artistic approaches. The exhibition opens January 13.

“We are thrilled to present this exhibition of work made by many of the outstanding artists who live and work in North Carolina,” said Trevor Schoonmaker, Mary D.B.T. and James H. Semans Director of the Nasher Museum. “The exhibition reflects the collective work and energy of the artists and our curatorial team over many months, and I’m especially grateful for their ability to think creatively during challenging times. At our core, we seek to champion the work of thought-provoking artists, and that is exactly what this show does.”

The show includes drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, ceramics, textiles, performance and experimental video. The artists explore themes surrounding historical and current events, identity, loss, remembrance, trauma and healing.

We’ve had two years of a global pandemic, political chaos, ongoing deadly racism and environmental injustice—the need to reexamine ourselves and the world around us has never been more urgent. The artists in this exhibition invite us to reckon with hard truths, seek healing in collective reflection and demand transformative action.

Marshall N. Price, Chief Curator and Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

Artists

Saba Taj, Borders/Portals (are so Gay) from the series there are gardens at the margins, 2020. Acrylic paint, oil paint, spray paint, gold leaf, and glitter on canvas; 72 x 72 inches (182.9 x 182.9 cm). Courtesy of the artist. © Saba Taj.
Saba Taj, Borders/Portals (are so Gay) from the series there are gardens at the margins, 2020. Acrylic paint, oil paint, spray paint, gold leaf, and glitter on canvas; 72 x 72 inches (182.9 x 182.9 cm). Courtesy of the artist. © Saba Taj.

Elizabeth Alexander, Johannes Barfield, Kennedi Carter, Kimberley Pierce Cartwright, Jessica Clark, Steven M. Cozart, Julia Gartrell, Ayla Gizlice, Stephen Hayes, Clarence Heyward, Jibade-Khalil Huffman, Sam Hunter Digges and Xiaowei Wu, Hunter Ashley Johnson, Juan Logan, Jennifer Markowitz, Beverly McIver, Ambrose Rhapsody Murray, Bishop Ortega, Renzo Ortega, Sherrill Roland, Meg Stein, Saba Taj, William Paul Thomas, Lien Truong, Cornell Watson, Antoine Williams, Charles Edward Williams, Jade Wilson and Stephanie J. Woods.

Learn more.

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The Nasher Museum is fully open to the public with free admission for all, including Thursday nights and weekends. We strongly encourage all individuals to be fully vaccinated before visiting the Nasher.