Skip to main content

I think the fact of the matter is I'm here because I'm supposed to be here, right? My story connects with people in a way that has gotten me to where I am. And I want them to understand that. Just tell your truth, tell your story. And if you really want to do it, just do it, and you will end up exactly where you're supposed to be.

Artist Clarence Heyward

About this Podcast

Welcome to the Nasher Museum Podcast! This episode features artist Clarence Heyward, who was born in Brooklyn and lives in Durham, N.C., and whose paintings are part of Reckoning and Resilience: North Carolina Art Now. He is in conversation with Tatiana McInnis, who teaches American Studies and Humanities at the North Carolina School of Science and Math. More episodes will be added  throughout the exhibition, on view through July 10, 2022.

Listen and Subscribe


Subscribe to the Nasher Museum Podcast on:

Apple Podcasts
Google Podcasts
SoundCloud
Spotify
RSS

The transcript is available below.

About Clarence and Tatiana

Clarence Heyward was born and raised in Brooklyn, NY. He is a painter and collageist whose work aims to explore and incite dialogue around culture, identity and circumstance while drawing upon his experiences as a Black man living in the United States. Heyward relocated to North Carolina to study Art Education at North Carolina Central University. In 2019 he began his journey as a full-time artist. His work has been exhibited nationally and is currently on view at 21C Museum Hotel of Durham, The Harvey B Gantt Center in Charlotte and the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. In Spring of ’22, his museum solo exhibition opens at the Contemporary Art Museum of Raleigh.

Tatiana McInnis is an instructor of American Studies and Humanities at the North Carolina School of Science and Math. Originally from South Florida, she earned her doctorate in English from Vanderbilt University in 2017, teaching there as an instructor in English and Cultural Studies classes and she has designed and led courses on diaspora, the prison industrial complex, racism and social justice. When she’s not with her students, you’ll find her snuggling her dog, Hurston (as in Zora Neale), hiking, reading or tending to her house plants.

How do you talk about history in a moment where your students are traumatized? And then how do you talk about history as I've been taught to teach it, which is, you know, learning about the past to think about the present and the future? And in terms of getting it right, I think it's naming that really explicitly to my students that we are grappling with these questions on a daily basis and also telling them about the problems of our archives.

Tatiana McInnis, high school teacher of American Studies and Humanities

Podcast Transcript

Clarence Heyward
I think the fact of the matter is I’m here because I’m supposed to be here, right? My story connects with people in a way that has gotten me to where I am. And I want them to understand that. Just tell your truth, tell your story. And if you really want to do it, just do it. And you will end up exactly where you’re supposed to be.

I’m Clarence Hayward. I’m a visual artist based in Clayton, North Carolina.

Tatiana McInnis
My name’s Tatiana McInnis. I’m living in Raleigh but I work in Durham and I’m an instructor in the humanities department at the North Carolina School of Science and Math.

TM
My first kind of just like grounding conversation starter for you, Clarence, was to tell me and us a little bit about your journey to becoming an artist.

CH
Oh wow, it’s a pretty long journey. So I grew up going to museums and art shows and stuff and I also was in art schools as a young kid. I went to art programs. So that led me to actually majoring in art education in college because I always heard that if you were an artist, you had to teach to make money, because, you know, most artists were starving. But during my student teaching, my last year of college, they told us what the salary was for a teacher, which was $25,000, $25,252. I should get that tattooed on me, because I always will remember that number, because it changed my life forever.

Nasher Podcast Team

J Caldwell, staff photographer, videographer, social media manager, Nasher Museum

Wendy Hower, director of engagement & marketing, Nasher Museum

Dani Yan, Duke Class of 2022, marketing intern, Nasher Museum

Organization and Support

This exhibition was organized by the Nasher Museum’s curatorial department: Molly Boarati, associate curator; Adria Gunter, curatorial assistant; Melissa Gwynn, exhibitions and publications manager; Lauren Haynes, Patsy R. and Raymond D. Nasher Senior Curator of Contemporary Art; and Marshall N. Price, Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Chief Curator and Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

Reckoning and Resilience: North Carolina Art Now is generously supported by Bank of America.

logo for Bank of America

Additional support provided by the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation; The Duke Endowment; Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Family Fund for Exhibitions; Frank Edward Hanscom Endowment Fund; Janine & J. Tomilson Hill Family Fund; J. Horst & Ruth Mary Meyer Fund; John & Anita Schwarz Family Endowment; Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans Foundation; Katie Thorpe Kerr and Terrance I. R. Kerr; Lisa Lowenthal Pruzan and Jonathan Pruzan; and Kelly Braddy Van Winkle and Lance Van Winkle.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter

The Nasher Museum is fully open to the public with free admission for all, including Thursday nights and weekends. We strongly encourage all individuals to be fully vaccinated before visiting the Nasher.